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Jul 22, 2014 / 978 notes
even more yum
Jul 22, 2014 / 938 notes

even more yum

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holy yum

masterchefonfox:

Pumpkin Fettuccine, Roasted Chicken and Spicy Corn Purée
submitted by thewayweate
By the late 1980’s, Americans had already become completely enthralled with the glamour and simplicity of Italian Cuisine. Fresh pasta was something of a national obsession as a new generation of gourmands were introduced to the old-world array of pasta-bilities that Italy had to offer. Also popular in the late 1980’s was a leaning toward low-fat, recipes that relied far more on olive oil than the copious amount of butter called for in the 1960’s and 70’s. Grilled chicken breast became not only a restaurant staple, but an oft featured item on home menus from decadent dinner parties to weeknight whip-ups at home.
 With a nod to both of these well held trends of the 1980’s, The Way We Ate offers a dish that would have easily been found in an American dining room or restaurant in the era of big hair, big shoulder pads and even bigger egos.
Pumpkin Fettuccine, Roasted Chicken and Spicy Corn Purée
Prepare the Spicy Corn Purée:
2 - Fresh, whole Jalapeño Peppers
1 - Can of Baby Corn
1/2 Cup - Heavy Cream
Salt and Pepper
Heat a heavy cast iron skillet over high heat, and dry roast the peppers on the skillet.
Press the peppers occasionally into the skillet using a large heavy spoon, turning the peppers frequently to blacken and char them on all sides. Once fully blackened (about 10 minutes) remove peppers and allow to cool. Slice peppers in half, removing all stems, seeds and ribs. Using a small knife, remove the dried blackened skin to reveal the charred flesh. set aside.
In a food processor, combine drained corn, jalapeños and spices. Process on high for about 1 minute with a tablespoon of water, until smooth. Restart Machine and add heavy cream in a stream to processor, and process until combined (about 30 seconds). Set aside at room temperature. 
Prepare the Pumpkin Fettuccine:
1 Cup - All-Purpose White Flour
1 Cup - Semolina Flour
1 Teaspoon - Kosher Salt
1/4 Teaspoon fresh ground pepper
2 tablespoons - Olive Oil
2 - Egg Yolks
2/3 Cup - Canned Pumpkin Puree 
2 Cups - Grape Tomatoes
10 to 12 - White Pearl Onions
1 Tablespoon - fresh rosemary
3/4 Cup - Tinned Chicken Broth
1 Cup - Sliced Black Olives
1 Cup - Fresh Chick Peas (Casing Removed)
Preheat oven to 450.
Combine the flours, salt and pepper in a large bowl and stir with a whisk. Add egg yolks and pumpkin, combining the mixture with hands until fully incorporated. If necessary, add more flour or pumpkin to obtain a consistency that’s solid and moist, but does not stick to hands. roll dough into a tube and cut in four pieces. Press each piece into a disc, and wrap well in wax paper. Place discs in refrigerator to rest. 
Meanwhile, slice tomatoes in half and add to a bowl. Peel pearl onions, slice in half, and add them to bowl with rosemary, olive oil, and a pinch of salt and pepper. Combine to coat with the olive oil and pour them into a rimmed baking sheet. Place in oven on center rack for 20-30 minutes until well roasted, but not blackened. Set aside to cool.
Add cooled ingredients to food processor, and purée well. place mixture in small sauce pan and add tinned broth stirring to combine. over very low heat, reduce mixture by 1/3. (about 30 minutes)
in another small saucepan, Steam chick peas in a vegetable steamer over medium heat, with water in a small saucepan for 15-20 minutes. Place in a small bowl and allow to cool.
Remove 2 discs of pasta from refrigerator (reserving other two for another meal).
On a well floured surface, roll pasta out to about 1/16” thickness in a large rectangle, using a straight or “french” rolling pin.Dust pasta sheet liberally with flour and starting with the shorter end of the rectangle, roll pasta into a tube (as you would a Jelly Roll), and slice tube using a large kitchen knife at 1/2” intervals.  Unroll each noodle and hang on plastic hangers. Repeat with second disc and allow both hangers of pasta to dry slightly.
Prepare The Chicken Breast:
2 - Bone-in Chicken Breasts
1 - tablespoon olive oil
pinch of salt 
pinch of pepper
Rinse chicken breasts under cold water and pat dry. Coat breasts with olive oil and sprinkle with salt and pepper. Prepare a charcoal grill and roast the breasts over medium hot smoldering coals. Turn chicken frequently and roast on all sides for 10 minutes, or until the breasts read 165 Degrees on a thermometer. Remove from grill and tent with tin foil.
Combine and serve the dish:
Prepare a pot with about 1 quart of salted water and bring to a rolling boil. Boil pasta for 30-60 seconds until done and strain, reserving a few tablespoons of the water, if needed.
In a large bowl combine the pasta, the reduced tomato mixture, the chick peas, and the sliced olives. Toss and add a few teaspoons of the pasta water if needed to loosen the mixture and coat the pasta well. Plate the pasta with one chicken breast per person, and add about 1/4 cup of the spicy corn puree over or alongside the chicken. 
Jul 22, 2014 / 17,822 notes

holy yum

masterchefonfox:

Pumpkin Fettuccine, Roasted Chicken and Spicy Corn Purée

submitted by thewayweate

By the late 1980’s, Americans had already become completely enthralled with the glamour and simplicity of Italian Cuisine. Fresh pasta was something of a national obsession as a new generation of gourmands were introduced to the old-world array of pasta-bilities that Italy had to offer. Also popular in the late 1980’s was a leaning toward low-fat, recipes that relied far more on olive oil than the copious amount of butter called for in the 1960’s and 70’s. Grilled chicken breast became not only a restaurant staple, but an oft featured item on home menus from decadent dinner parties to weeknight whip-ups at home.


With a nod to both of these well held trends of the 1980’s, The Way We Ate offers a dish that would have easily been found in an American dining room or restaurant in the era of big hair, big shoulder pads and even bigger egos.

Pumpkin Fettuccine, Roasted Chicken and Spicy Corn Purée

Prepare the Spicy Corn Purée:

2 - Fresh, whole Jalapeño Peppers

1 - Can of Baby Corn

1/2 Cup - Heavy Cream

Salt and Pepper

Heat a heavy cast iron skillet over high heat, and dry roast the peppers on the skillet.

Press the peppers occasionally into the skillet using a large heavy spoon, turning the peppers frequently to blacken and char them on all sides. Once fully blackened (about 10 minutes) remove peppers and allow to cool. Slice peppers in half, removing all stems, seeds and ribs. Using a small knife, remove the dried blackened skin to reveal the charred flesh. set aside.

In a food processor, combine drained corn, jalapeños and spices. Process on high for about 1 minute with a tablespoon of water, until smooth. Restart Machine and add heavy cream in a stream to processor, and process until combined (about 30 seconds). Set aside at room temperature. 

Prepare the Pumpkin Fettuccine:

1 Cup - All-Purpose White Flour

1 Cup - Semolina Flour

1 Teaspoon - Kosher Salt

1/4 Teaspoon fresh ground pepper

2 tablespoons - Olive Oil

2 - Egg Yolks

2/3 Cup - Canned Pumpkin Puree 

2 Cups - Grape Tomatoes

10 to 12 - White Pearl Onions

1 Tablespoon - fresh rosemary

3/4 Cup - Tinned Chicken Broth

1 Cup - Sliced Black Olives

1 Cup - Fresh Chick Peas (Casing Removed)

Preheat oven to 450.

Combine the flours, salt and pepper in a large bowl and stir with a whisk. Add egg yolks and pumpkin, combining the mixture with hands until fully incorporated. If necessary, add more flour or pumpkin to obtain a consistency that’s solid and moist, but does not stick to hands. roll dough into a tube and cut in four pieces. Press each piece into a disc, and wrap well in wax paper. Place discs in refrigerator to rest. 

Meanwhile, slice tomatoes in half and add to a bowl. Peel pearl onions, slice in half, and add them to bowl with rosemary, olive oil, and a pinch of salt and pepper. Combine to coat with the olive oil and pour them into a rimmed baking sheet. Place in oven on center rack for 20-30 minutes until well roasted, but not blackened. Set aside to cool.

Add cooled ingredients to food processor, and purée well. place mixture in small sauce pan and add tinned broth stirring to combine. over very low heat, reduce mixture by 1/3. (about 30 minutes)

in another small saucepan, Steam chick peas in a vegetable steamer over medium heat, with water in a small saucepan for 15-20 minutes. Place in a small bowl and allow to cool.

Remove 2 discs of pasta from refrigerator (reserving other two for another meal).

On a well floured surface, roll pasta out to about 1/16” thickness in a large rectangle, using a straight or “french” rolling pin.Dust pasta sheet liberally with flour and starting with the shorter end of the rectangle, roll pasta into a tube (as you would a Jelly Roll), and slice tube using a large kitchen knife at 1/2” intervals.  Unroll each noodle and hang on plastic hangers. Repeat with second disc and allow both hangers of pasta to dry slightly.

Prepare The Chicken Breast:

2 - Bone-in Chicken Breasts

1 - tablespoon olive oil

pinch of salt 

pinch of pepper

Rinse chicken breasts under cold water and pat dry. Coat breasts with olive oil and sprinkle with salt and pepper. Prepare a charcoal grill and roast the breasts over medium hot smoldering coals. Turn chicken frequently and roast on all sides for 10 minutes, or until the breasts read 165 Degrees on a thermometer. Remove from grill and tent with tin foil.

Combine and serve the dish:

Prepare a pot with about 1 quart of salted water and bring to a rolling boil. Boil pasta for 30-60 seconds until done and strain, reserving a few tablespoons of the water, if needed.

In a large bowl combine the pasta, the reduced tomato mixture, the chick peas, and the sliced olives. Toss and add a few teaspoons of the pasta water if needed to loosen the mixture and coat the pasta well. Plate the pasta with one chicken breast per person, and add about 1/4 cup of the spicy corn puree over or alongside the chicken. 

@doNYC made my night. Michael Franti, Brett Dennon, Trevor Hall and Soja all cause I entered to win free tix. Best night in the city!!
Jul 21, 2014

@doNYC made my night. Michael Franti, Brett Dennon, Trevor Hall and Soja all cause I entered to win free tix. Best night in the city!!

When someone tries to wake me up before 10am on a Saturday.
comedycentral:

Wedding Crashers is starting right now! Watch it with us and tweet your favorite lines to @ComedyCentral with hashtag #WeddingCrashers.
Jul 19, 2014 / 126 notes

When someone tries to wake me up before 10am on a Saturday.

comedycentral:

Wedding Crashers is starting right now! Watch it with us and tweet your favorite lines to @ComedyCentral with hashtag #WeddingCrashers.

fastcompany:

Seven of this year’s Forty Over 40 Women to Watch honorees share how innovation improves with age.
Red wine. Cheese. Innovation. Yes, these are all things that get better with age. Don’t believe it? Science offers some pretty compelling evidence that wunderkinds are the exception, rather than the rule.
One researcher found that Nobel Prize winners’ age around a significant breakthrough is about 38 (and not recognized until they’re 60) and another posits that a lifetime of learning leads to greater breakthroughs between ages 55-65. Data from the Kauffmann Foundation bears this out as findings indicate people over 55 are almost twice as likely to found successful companies than those between 20 and 34.
These statistics are seldom recognized, much less celebrated, in a youth obsessed culture, according to Whitney Johnson, author and cofounder of investment firm Rose Park Advisors. That’s why she and Christina Vuleta, founder of Women’s career advice forum 40:20 Vision, took matters into their own hands.
They started an initiative, dubbed Forty Over 40 in 2013 to change the idea that mid-life means you’re on the down side of over-the-hill. This year’s honorees range from 40 to over 60 and come from a variety of industries including the arts, law, retail, health care, and tech. Each has an impressive resume, not limited to an accumulation of greater titles and industry accolades.
As Johnson writes, “At age 40 we’re just getting to the best part. After spending years on the low end of the S-curve of experience, we are now ready to accelerate into a sweet spot of competence and contribution.”
With that in mind, we asked several of this year’s honorees to share their thoughts on aging, disruption, and transitions. Here’s what they told us.
Read More>
Jul 18, 2014 / 62 notes

fastcompany:

Seven of this year’s Forty Over 40 Women to Watch honorees share how innovation improves with age.

Red wine. Cheese. Innovation. Yes, these are all things that get better with age. Don’t believe it? Science offers some pretty compelling evidence that wunderkinds are the exception, rather than the rule.

One researcher found that Nobel Prize winners’ age around a significant breakthrough is about 38 (and not recognized until they’re 60) and another posits that a lifetime of learning leads to greater breakthroughs between ages 55-65. Data from the Kauffmann Foundation bears this out as findings indicate people over 55 are almost twice as likely to found successful companies than those between 20 and 34.

These statistics are seldom recognized, much less celebrated, in a youth obsessed culture, according to Whitney Johnson, author and cofounder of investment firm Rose Park Advisors. That’s why she and Christina Vuleta, founder of Women’s career advice forum 40:20 Vision, took matters into their own hands.

They started an initiative, dubbed Forty Over 40 in 2013 to change the idea that mid-life means you’re on the down side of over-the-hill. This year’s honorees range from 40 to over 60 and come from a variety of industries including the arts, law, retail, health care, and tech. Each has an impressive resume, not limited to an accumulation of greater titles and industry accolades.

As Johnson writes, “At age 40 we’re just getting to the best part. After spending years on the low end of the S-curve of experience, we are now ready to accelerate into a sweet spot of competence and contribution.”

With that in mind, we asked several of this year’s honorees to share their thoughts on aging, disruption, and transitions. Here’s what they told us.

Read More>

So much swag
Jul 14, 2014 / 223 notes

So much swag

Jul 9, 2014 / 957 notes

SAVING MY FRIEND FROM A CREEPER

howdoiputthisgently:

I’M LIKE:

What are best friends for?

Jul 9, 2014
Jul 9, 2014 / 35,517 notes